Food

Gulf of Mexico “Dead Zone” Is Size of New Jersey

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 25, 2005   View Article

Each year a swath of the Gulf of Mexico becomes so devoid of shrimp, fish, and other marine life that it is known as the dead zone.

Scientists have identified agricultural fertilizers as a primary culprit behind the phenomenon. Researchers are now focusing on shrinking the zone.

Bizarre New Dinosaur Shows Evolution to Plant Eating, Study Says

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 4, 2005   View Article

First noticed by a black market fossil dealer, a new species found in a Utah boneyard may be a missing link in dinosaurs’ trend toward vegetarianism.

The 125-million-year-old fossils, from the dinosaur Falcarius utahensis, were discovered in a graveyard of hundreds, if not thousands, of individuals. Though it may have eaten meat, Falcarius’s teeth and guts show the first signs of the species’s change toward a leafy, green diet, said James Kirkland, a paleontologist at the Utah Geological Survey in Salt Lake City.

Ramp Fests Add Flavor, Stench, to Appalachian Spring

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: April 29, 2005   View Article

On Sunday, Cathey Owens vows to give the ramps on her dinner plate to the first person who will take the onionlike herbs. With upward of 3,000 people expected to attend the 52nd annual Cosby Ramp Festival in Cosby, Tennessee, finding a taker should be easy.

“If you eat one, you’re going to stink, and the more you eat, the more you’re going to stink,” said Owens, who is helping to organize the annual event in Cosby.

UN, Jimmy Carter, Say Time Is Ripe to End Hunger

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: March 14, 2005   View Article

The time is now for the richest nations to share their cash, food, and knowledge with the hundreds of millions of people enduring extreme poverty and hunger, according a recent UN report.

“Millions of people die annually of hunger and hunger-related diseases, and many millions more suffer needlessly where famine is preventable,” Jimmy Carter, 39th President of the United States and 2002 Nobel Peace Prize laureate, told National Geographic News.

Annual Ice Harvest Evokes Pre-Fridge Era in New York

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: March 2, 2005   View Article

On a hot summer day, few things beat a bowl of old-fashioned, homemade strawberry ice cream. This June, residents of Tully, New York, will get just such an authentic treat, right down to the ice used to freeze the cream.

The ice was hauled out of the town’s Green Lake this February during the annual Tully Ice Harvest. The 18-inch-by-18-inch (46-centimeter-by-46-centimeter) chunks of frozen water are currently packed with insulating sawdust in the town’s ice shed.

No Nuts, No Problem: Squirrels Harvest Maple Syrup

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: February 18, 2005   View Article

Though daylight lingers longer this time of year, winter’s grip remains strong, and many critters’ food stores are running low. How do they survive?

“There’s always some mechanism that allows animals to make it through the winter as a species,” said John Serrao, a naturalist in Pennsylvania’s Pocono Mountains.

Potato Vaccine for Hepatitis B: Syringes off the Menu?

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: February 15, 2005   View Article

Scientists have shown that, for hepetitis B vaccine, genetically modified potatoes may be an alternative to the syringe and needle.

The hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes liver failure and liver cancer. Despite the availability of a safe, injectable vaccine, the virus currently infects an estimated 350 million people worldwide and kills about a million people every year.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach