Food

Plastic Bag Bans Gaining Momentum Around the World

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: April 4, 2008   View Article

From Australia to the U.K., and all across the U.S., politicians and corporations are pondering banning or taxing plastic bags.

“Doomsday” Vault Will End Crop Extinction, Expert Says

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: December 27, 2007   View Article

Deep in Norway’s frozen Svalbard archipelago sits a high-tech facility that could save the world.

If global catastrophes like asteroid impacts or disease pandemics were to strike, seeds stored in this first ever “doomsday” vault would ensure that humans could regrow the crops needed for survival.

Sea Lice From Fish Farms May Wipe Out Wild Salmon

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: December 13, 2007   View Article

Four years from now wild pink salmon may vanish from Canada’s Broughton Archipelago, a new study warns.

The killers, according to the research, are sea lice from fish farms.

African Slaves Brought First Rice Riches to U.S.?

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: November 28, 2007   View Article

A rice variety that made many a colonial plantation owner rich was brought to the United States from West Africa, according to preliminary genetic research.

The finding suggests that African slaves are responsible for nearly every facet of one of the first rice varieties grown in the U.S., as well as one of the most lucrative crops in early American history.

Cicadas as Food: Summer’s Low-Fat Snack?

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 22, 2007   View Article

High-protein, low-carb dieters take note: The billions of cicadas emerging from the ground this month in the midwestern U.S. are a healthy alternative to that bacon double-cheeseburger without the bun.

“They’re high in protein, low in fat, no carbs,” said Gene Kritsky, a biologist and cicada expert at the College of Mount St. Joseph in Cincinnati, Ohio, speaking to National Geographic News during the last major cicada outbreak, in 2004.

Americans Cooked With Chili Peppers 6,000 Years Ago, Study Finds

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: February 15, 2007   View Article

Domesticated chili peppers started to spice up dishes across the Americas at least 6,000 years ago, according to new research tracing the early spread of the crop.

Peppers quickly spread around the world after Christopher Columbus brought them back to Europe at the end of the 15th century, but their ancient history had been poorly known until now.

Warming Oceans Put Kink in Food Chain, Study Says

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 30, 2007   View Article

The growth of tiny plants at the base of the ocean food chain is tightly linked to changes in the climate, according to a recent study.

The finding shows that as temperatures warm, the growth of single-celled ocean plants called phytoplankton slows at Earth’s mid and low latitudes. The plants’ growth increases when the climate cools.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach