For Thrush, Flight Less Taxing Than “Rest,” Study Says

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: June 11, 2003   View Article

Over the course of their migration from Panama to Canada, New World Catharus thrushes spend twice as much energy slurping worms, munching snails, and heating their bodies than they do actually flapping their wings in flight, according to new research.

Henk Visser, a zoologist at the University of Groningen in The Netherlands, said that although this seems counterintuitive, it makes sense.

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