Wireless

No batteries! Wireless tech recycles airborne radio waves

Publication: NBC News   Date: August 13, 2013   View Article

A world full of Internet-connected devices is a giant step closer to reality thanks to a new communications system that works without batteries or wires for power.

Just as we use mirrors to reflect light, or turbines to catch the wind, this technique — known as “ambient backscatter”— co-opts transmissions from TV and cellular towers and reflects them to exchange information between wireless devices. These waves serve as both a source of power and carriers of information.

The revolution at work is here

Publication: msnbc.com   Date: August 12, 2011   View Article

The Internet bubble inflated during the late 1990s partly on the promise that technology would revolutionize how and where we work. More than a decade after the bubble popped, the workspace revolution is finally upon us, according to a technology company executive.

“As the world has progressed over the past 10 years, pretty much everything has gone towards an IP-based way of doing things,” Rick Hutley, vice president of global innovation at San Jose, Calif.-based Cisco Systems, told me in a wide-ranging interview Thursday.

Sensors to avert ‘carmageddons’

Publication: msnbc.com   Date: August 1, 2011   View Article

The much-hyped carmageddon predicted last month for Los Angeles never materialized when a stretch of highway was closed to allow a bridge demolition, but commuters may not be so lucky if one of the nation’s thousands of deteriorating spans suddenly collapses.

That’s the sort of scenario that Medhi Kalantari hopes to avoid with the deployment of wireless sensors on the nation’s — and world’s — aging bridges. One in four U.S. highway bridges is either structurally deficient or functionally obsolete, according to a 2009 estimate by the U.S. Society of Civil Engineers.

Tiny circuit big boost for electronics

Publication: msnbc.com   Date: June 9, 2011   View Article

Wireless communications took a small leap forward today with the announcement that researchers have created a functional integrated circuit smaller than a grain of salt.

The circuit is a broadband frequency mixer, which is “one of the most fundamental and important circuits in essentially all wireless communication devices and equipment,” Yu-Ming Lin, an IBM researcher who led the effort, told me today.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach