Vision

Rat-like image recognition to replace satellites

Publication: msnbc.com   Date: February 23, 2012   View Article

The images of nearly every major stretch of road taken by Google’s Street View team and the snapshots we capture with our smartphones may soon be all we need to navigate the world, according to an Australian researcher.

That is, we can ditch the expensive satellite and computer technologies that power modern GPS systems and rely on low-resolution pictures instead, Michael Milford, an engineer at the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, explained.

X-Ray “Vision” Unlocking Black Hole Mysteries

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 24, 2005   View Article

Advances in x-ray astronomy are resolving some enduring mysteries about black holes, scientists say. Black holes are places in space where the force of gravity is so strong that nothing, not even light, can escape.

In recent years scientists have learned to find black holes by sweeping the skies with space-based telescopes equipped with x-ray “vision.” X-rays are a high-energy form of light that is invisible to the human eye.

Dino-Age Flyers Were Sharp-Eyed, Nimble, Study Says

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: October 29, 2003   View Article

Chances were good that prey snared in the sight of a soaring pterodactyl was as good as dead as soon as it was spotted, according to scientists who used sophisticated scanners and computer graphics to digitally reconstruct the brains of the extinct flying reptiles.

“It gives us a window into the behavior of these animals in a way we never thought possible,” said Lawrence Witmer, an evolutionary biologist at Ohio University in Athens.

Video Games Boost Visual Skills, Study Finds

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 28, 2003   View Article

Spending hours in front of the computer trying to single-handedly win World War II in the shoot-‘em-up action video game Medal of Honor may serve more purpose than killing time.

According to a pair of researchers at the University of Rochester in New York, such action video games train the brain to better process certain visual information.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach