Train

Environmental Consequences of Oil Train Derailment Unclear

Publication: NBC News   Date: February 17, 2015   View Article

Wreckage from a derailed oil train smoldered in West Virginia on Tuesday as environmentalists waited to see whether surrounding water and wildlife would be tainted by the train’s cargo of North Dakota crude.

For some in the area, the latest incident also brought on memories of when a coal-cleaning chemical spilled into a nearby river a year ago and shut off drinking water to nearly 300,000 people for several weeks, said Judith Rodd, director of Friends of the Blackwater, an environmental group based in Charleston, West Virginia.

Pacific Northwest’s Salish Sea Eyed as Fossil Fuel Gateway

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 9, 2014   View Article

Trains loaded with crude oil from North Dakota’s Bakken shale formation rumble past the outfield bleachers of the Seattle Mariners’ baseball stadium several times a week. From there, the trains head north, their cargo destined for multiple refineries in Washington State.

The traffic is new: Just three years ago, no oil trains were coming to Washington. Bakken crude is filling a void created by dwindling shipments from aging oil fields on Alaska’s North Slope, and the petroleum industry wants to bring in more. But the push to build more rail and shipping capacity in the Pacific Northwest is spurring debate over how that oil flow will affect the region—and where it should ultimately go.

Battery aging reversed to keep electric train chugging along

Publication: NBC News   Date: January 4, 2013   View Article

Researchers have written an algorithm that reverses aging in rechargeable lead-acid batteries, a breakthrough that will let them keep their all-electric train chugging along longer.

“To be able to rejuvenate anything is pretty remarkable,” Christopher Rahn, a mechanical engineer at Pennsylvania State University, told NBC News. “I mean, how many times in life do you actually reverse aging?”

Classic 1937 steam engine soon to run carbon-free

Publication: msnbc.com   Date: May 25, 2012   View Article

A steam train built in 1937 is getting a makeover that will turn it into a “higher-speed” locomotive that runs on biocoal, a coal-like fuel made with woody plant material.

When finished, the train will be able chug along existing tracks at speeds up to 130 miles per hour without contributing to the greenhouse gas pollution blamed for global warming.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach