STEM

Students, prompted by massacre, design emergency lock to thwart shooters

Publication: NBC News   Date: October 24, 2013   View Article

The killing spree at Sandy Hook Elementary School in suburban Connecticut last December sent a chill across America. If the unthinkable happened there, it could happen anywhere. The concern prompted a team of high school students in Washington, D.C., to design an inexpensive and effective emergency door-locking mechanism to prevent active shooters from entering their classrooms.

Like many schools around the country, the doors at Benjamin Banneker Academic High School lack classroom-side locks, a building code regulation leftover from a time when fire was the biggest threat to student safety. Unlockable doors mean students can escape a burning classroom quickly. Yet in today’s world, students also worry about intruders coming into their classrooms and firing bullets.

Girl power! 9th grade girls developing electricity-generating desks

Publication: NBC News   Date: October 23, 2013   View Article

A team of 9th grade girls is developing a system of interconnected desks that turns the nervous foot-tapping energy of school kids into electricity to power study lights, laptops and fans. The young students aim to bring the desks to school children in Africa.

“In order to get a good education, one of the basic foundations is electricity,” Rose DelleFave, the team leader at Providence Day School in Charlotte, N.C., told NBC News. “So we decided it would be good to start there and give them that basic tool.”

High-school girls invent a life-preserver T-shirt for toddlers

Publication: NBC News   Date: October 17, 2012   View Article

An all-girl team of high school students has invented a comfy and cozy T-shirt equipped with a mechanism that automatically inflates it into a life preserver when it gets soaking wet.

Called the Watawescue, the T-shirt is intended for children age 2 to 4 to wear while they are playing near a swimming pool.

17-year-old girl builds artificial ‘brain’ to detect breast cancer

Publication: NBC News   Date: July 24, 2012   View Article

An artificial “brain” built by a 17-year-old whiz kid from Florida is able to accurately assess tissue samples for signs of breast cancer, providing more confidence to a minimally invasive procedure.

The cloud-based neural network took top prize in this year’s Google Science Fair.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach