Snow

Kilimanjaro’s Snows Gone by 2022?

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: November 2, 2009   View Article

Ernest Hemingway must be reaching for a bottle of grappa in his grave. The snows of Kilimanjaro—inspirations for a Hemingway story of the same name—could be gone by 2022, a new study confirms.

The ice atop Kilimanjaro “continues to diminish right on schedule for disappearing, unfortunately, in the next couple of decades,” said glaciologist Lonnie Thompson at Ohio State University in Columbus.

10 wonders in a winter wonderland

Publication: MSNBC.com   Date: December 3, 2008   View Article

Is every snowflake unique? Where’s the worst weather in the world? Why is the winter night sky so clear? Find answers to these and more questions that tend to pile up in a winter wonderland.

Ancient “Snowball Earth” Melted Fast Due to Methane

Publication:   Date:   View Article

A massive release of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, may have triggered rapid melting of the last “snowball Earth” about 635 million years ago, a new study suggests.

“No Two Snowflakes the Same” Likely True, Research Reveals

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: February 13, 2007   View Article

More than ten feet (three meters) of snow fell last week in parts of upstate New York, and more is forecast for the U.S. Northeast in the coming days.

In all that snow, however, scientists believe the chance that any two flakes are exactly alike is virtually zero.

Antarctic Snowfall Not Curbing Sea Level Rise, Study Says

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: August 11, 2006   View Article

Snowfall amounts in Antarctica have not increased for the past 50 years, according to a new study.

The finding suggests that Antarctica’s snowfall is not slowing the sea level rise caused by global warming, as most climate models predict.

It also supports a theory that the icy continent is mostly isolated from the rest of the world’s climate system.

Snow Algae Shade Most (Not All) Colored Snow

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: June 7, 2005   View Article

It may be the start of summer, but Ron Hoham and a few other scientists like him are thinking about snow, specifically colored snow.

Where others see an excuse to snicker about yellow snow, Hoham sees other shades—and one of the most extreme and overlooked life-forms on Earth.

In Rockies Meadow, Early Spring Gives Some Experts Chills

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: April 11, 2005   View Article

For nearly three decades scientists have carefully watched a Rocky Mountain meadow spring to life.

The meadow is nestled at about 9,500 feet (2,900 meters) above sea level between towering, snowcapped peaks a few miles outside the resort town of Crested Butte, Colorado. The field has been home to the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory (RMBL, pronounced “rumble”) for 75 years.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach