Saturn

Probe Set to Enter Titan’s Atmosphere

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 13, 2005   View Article

If all goes according to plan, Huygens will parachute through Titan’s hazy atmosphere tomorrow. The 8.9-foot-wide (2.7-meter-wide), 703- pound (319-kilogram) probe should land somewhere just south of the moon’s equator.

Scientists from around the world have been waiting for years for the moment when Huygens sends back to Earth images and readings from Saturn’s mysterious moon’s atmosphere.

Cassini Probe to Fly by Saturn’s Moon Titan Tuesday

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: October 22, 2004   View Article

The Cassini spacecraft is set to buzz through the upper atmosphere of Saturn’s moon Titan on Tuesday. If all goes according to plan, the probe will use high-tech cameras during the flyby to peer through Titan’s hazy orange atmosphere and peek at the moon’s mysterious surface.

“This is the first good look at Titan,” said Dennis Matson, project scientist for the Cassini-Huygens Mission to Saturn and Titan at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

Cassini Spacecraft Nears Saturn, Photographs Moon

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: June 14, 2004   View Article

After a seven-year, roundabout planetary voyage, the international Cassini-Huygens spacecraft is poised to begin a four-year tour of Saturn, its rings, and its 31 known moons, including Earthlike Titan. Already the craft has captured unprecedented views of the moon Phoebe (see image at right).

“In some sense, we’ll write the book on Saturn. I know that’s sort of a glib phrase, but that’s what we’ll do,” said Dennis Matson, project scientist for the Cassini-Huygens mission at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California.

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