Reef

Cousteau to Explore Remote Pacific Islands

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: July 7, 2003   View Article

Jean-Michel Cousteau embarked Sunday on a voyage along a 1,200-mile (2,000- kilometer) chain of remote islands and coral reefs in the tropical Pacific Ocean to document the marine life that thrives there and the traces of humankind that linger.

The atolls stretch out towards Asia from the main Hawaiian Islands and are known as the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. The islands serve as nesting grounds for green sea turtles (Chelonia brongniart), home to millions of seabirds, and a refuge for rare monk seals (Monachus fleming). The surrounding reefs swarm with life. But their remoteness has kept them out of the public eye and out of reach of even the most intrepid ocean explorers.

No Nemo: Anemones, Not Parents, Protect Clownfish

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: June 5, 2003   View Article

In the hit movie Finding Nemo an overprotective clownfish named Marlin searches for his son Nemo who is swiped from the Great Barrier Reef and plopped into a fish tank at a dentist’s office in Sydney, Australia.

The true protectors of clownfish in the ocean, however, are not parents but rather prickly, stinging sea anemones that live on reefs.

Finding Nemo Spotlights Dark Side of Pet-Fish Trade

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 30, 2003   View Article

As a young clownfish named Nemo enchants moviegoers with his epic adventure from the ocean to a fish tank and beyond, the actor whose voice brings the animated character to life is urging protection for tropical fish and coral reefs.

“Practically the whole world depends on coral reefs, so if the coral reefs get all killed, then the ocean will start going out of whack, and if the ocean goes out of whack something might happen on land,” said Alexander Gould, the nine-year-old actor who is the voice of the namesake character in the movie.

Rich Coral Reefs in Nutrient-Poor Water: Paradox Explained?

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: November 7, 2001   View Article

Coral reefs are the rain forests of the oceans, teeming with a biological diversity that boggles the mind. Just how did such profusion of life come to thrive in crystal-clear—and thus nutrient poor—water? The question has eluded scientists since Charles Darwin took his famous voyage on the H.M.S. Beagle in the 1830s.

Now, a team of German and Jordanian researchers may have the answer to this so-called coral reef paradox: an abundance of sponges that dwell inside the nooks and crannies of reef interiors.

Coral Reef Paradise Round in Remote Indonesian Islands

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: August 8, 2001   View Article

Scuba divers, take note: The waters of the Raja Ampat Islands off Indonesia’s province of Irian Jaya may replace heralded Palau as the most species-rich sea in the world.

An international team of marine biologists who visited the Raja Ampats recently to examine the reefs said they found what may be an unparalleled array of species—corals, fishes, and mollusks—including some species never seen before.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach