Native American

Ancient Gem Studded Teeth Show Skill of Ancient Dentist

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 18, 2009   View Article

The glittering “grills” of some hip-hop stars aren’t exactly unprecedented. Sophisticated dentistry allowed Native Americans to add bling to their teeth as far back as 2,500 years ago, a new study says.

Maya and other ancient peoples of southern North America went to “dentists”—among the earliest known—to beautify their chompers with notches, grooves, and semi-precious stones, according to a recent analysis of thousands of teeth examined from collections in Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History.

Ancient rock art from around the world

Publication: MSNBC.com   Date: March 23, 2009   View Article

Even 15,000 years ago, humans were compelled to decorate the interior walls of their abodes. Back then – the Stone Age – home was often no more than a cave, but the artwork was sophisticated and sublime. Check out eight examples of rock art from around the world.

Siberian, Native American Languages Linked – A First

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: March 26, 2008   View Article

A fast-dying language in remote central Siberia shares a mother tongue with dozens of Native American languages spoken thousands of miles away, new research confirms.

Comet Wiped Out Early North American Culture, Animals, Study Says

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 23, 2007   View Article

A comet exploded over North America about 13,000 years ago, causing a long bout of climate cooling, according to a controversial new theory presented today.

The extraterrestrial impact may help explain massive mammal die-offs and the demise of one of the earliest American cultures.

Americans Cooked With Chili Peppers 6,000 Years Ago, Study Finds

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: February 15, 2007   View Article

Domesticated chili peppers started to spice up dishes across the Americas at least 6,000 years ago, according to new research tracing the early spread of the crop.

Peppers quickly spread around the world after Christopher Columbus brought them back to Europe at the end of the 15th century, but their ancient history had been poorly known until now.

Navajo Help Save Unique Sheep From Extinction

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: August 30, 2005   View Article

A unique breed of sheep is again woven into the fabric of Navajo life, thanks to a veterinary scientist and Navajo and Hispanic shepherds who rescued the breed from extinction.

The breed, Navajo-Churro, was introduced to North America in the 16th century by Spanish colonists. The Navajo, also known as the Diné, quickly adopted the breed, considering it a gift from the spirits.

Dino-Era Fossils Inspired Monster Myths, Author Says

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: June 17, 2005   View Article

According to the Lakota, or Sioux, Indians’ “Water Monsters of the Badlands” legend, the rugged and eroded lands of southwestern South Dakota were the stage for an epic battle between water spirits and thunder and lightning spirits.

The water sprits were embodied by giant water monsters known as the Unktehi. Thunder and lighting spirits took the form of thunderbirds known as Wakinyan.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach