Mystery

Mysterious Tremors’ Strength Ebbs With Tides

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: November 22, 2007   View Article

The intensities of strange, long-lasting tremors in North America’s Pacific Northwest ramp up and quiet down with the rise and fall of the ocean’s tides, according to a new study.

These so-called nonvolcanic tremors are very faint seismic signals that were not discovered until 2002. Their exact cause remains a mystery.

Iceman Bled Out From Arrow Wound, X-Ray Scan Reveals

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: June 7, 2007   View Article

The prehistoric iceman known as Oetzi died from an arrow-inflicted lesion to an artery near his left shoulder, modern x-ray technology shows.

The finding clarifies the mystery of how the 46-year-old man died some 5,300 years ago high up on a mountain glacier in northern Italy.

Cricket, Katydid Songs Are Best Clues to Species’ Identities

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: September 5, 2006   View Article

In a nighttime chorus of insects, the easiest way to identify individual katydid and cricket species is by listening to their songs, according to one of the world’s leading authorities on the jumping insects.

“Without sound, we’d be in a pickle,” said Thomas Walker, an entomologist at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

Relying on morphology—body shape, structure, and color—to identify some katydids and crickets is next to impossible, he says.

Dark Matter Proof Found, Scientists Say

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: August 22, 2006   View Article

A team of researchers has found the first direct proof for the existence of dark matter, the mysterious and almost invisible substance thought to make up almost a quarter of the universe.

Dark matter does not absorb or emit light. So far, astronomers have inferred its presence only indirectly by measuring the effects of its gravity.

But now, by observing a massive collision between two large clusters of galaxies, astronomers have detected what they say could only be the signature of dark matter.

Where Is Amelia Earhart? – Three Theories

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: December 15, 2003   View Article

In the early morning hours of July 2, 1937, Amelia Earhart was scheduled to land her airplane on the tiny Pacific Ocean island of Howland just north of the Equator. She never arrived.

Her fate remains one of aviation’s greatest unsolved mysteries. Organizations and researchers have spent millions of dollars investigating the case and several books have been published that examine the differing theories.

Elusive Jaguars Remain a Mystery, Even to Experts

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: November 25, 2003   View Article

“Yaguara,” the South American Indian word for jaguar, literally means the animal that kills in a single bound.

The elusive, spotted-coat cats secretly stalk their prey until just the right moment. Then they pounce with a graceful thud: In one leap the cats must snap their prey’s spine or else go hungry.

Deciphering the Origin, Travels of “Iceman”

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: October 30, 2003   View Article

A 46-year-old man entombed by a glacier about 5,200 years ago high in the mountains that border Austria and Italy probably spent his entire life within a 37-mile (60-kilometer) range south of where he came to his final rest, according to a new study.

Two German hikers found the “Iceman,” also known as Ötzi, in the Ötzal Alps on September 19, 1991. He is heralded as the world’s oldest and best preserved mummy. Since the Iceman discovery, scientists have labored to piece together his life history.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach