Modern Human

“Hobbits” Were Separate Species, Skull Suggests

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 23, 2009   View Article

The skull of the so-called hobbit discovered on the Indonesian island of Flores in 2003 suggests its owner was an archaic human ancestor, not a diminutive or diseased modern human, according to a new study.

The conclusion stems from a comparison of the skull to the noggins of modern humans and apes, as well as the fossil brain cases of early human ancestors.

Massive Genetic Study Supports “Out of Africa” Theory

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: February 21, 2008   View Article

A massive new study of human genetic diversity reveals surprising insights into our species’ evolution and migrations—including support for the theory that the first modern humans originated in Africa—scientists said today.

Researchers compared 650,000 genetic markers in nearly a thousand individuals from 51 populations around the globe—an unprecedented level of detail for a human genetic study.

Mummies With Lice Offer New Clues to Human Migration

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: February 8, 2008   View Article

A common type of head lice picked from thousand-year-old Peruvian mummies suggests the pesky parasitic insects accompanied modern humans on their first migration out of Africa, according to a new study.

Researchers had thought Europeans brought the widespread louse species to the Americas about 500 years ago, said David Reed, who studies the parasites at the University of Florida’s Museum of Natural History in Gainesville.

Oldest Homo Sapiens Fossils Found, Experts Say

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: June 11, 2003   View Article

Three fossil skulls recovered from the windswept scrabble of Ethiopia’s dry and barren Afar rift valley lend archaeological credence to the theory that modern humans evolved in Africa before spreading around the world.

The fossils include two adult males and one child and are estimated to be 160,000 years old. They were found among stone tools and butchered hippopotamus bones. Cut marks on the skulls suggest an early form of mortuary practice.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach