Map

Forests disappearing since 2000? Google cloud maps global changes

Publication: NBC News   Date: November 14, 2013   View Article

In this era of big data, anyone can now see how and where the world’s forests are changing thanks to a new mapping project made possible, in part, by the computing resources of the tech giant Google.

The map compiles 100-foot-resolution satellite images of Earth’s land area taken each season, every year between 2000 and 2012, to paint a picture of where trees were lost or gained. Globally, the map shows that 888,000 square miles of forest were lost between 2000 and 2012. In the same period, 309,000 square miles were gained.

Ocean motion could produce 9 percent of U.S. electricity

Publication: msnbc.com   Date: January 31, 2012   View Article

Next-generation technologies that harvest electricity from ocean waves and tides sloshing along the U.S. coasts could provide about 9 percent of the nation’s demand by 2030, according to a pair of recent studies.

The findings, which include maps of these ocean energy resources, should help guide companies looking to develop them.

Venice “Ancestor” City Mapped for First Time

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: July 30, 2009   View Article

The outline of an ancient Roman city buried beneath cropland near Venice, Italy, has been mapped in detail for the first time with the aid of aerial photography, a new study says.

Until now the ancient city of Altinum, which dates back at least to the first century B.C., was known only from historical records and a few minor excavations.

Google-Earth Based Quiz Tests Kids’ Africa IQ

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: December 12, 2006   View Article

What’s the most populous city in Africa? Are the Mbuti a pygmy group? Which river, the Zambezi or the Nile, empties into the Mediterranean Sea?

Just a few years ago such an onslaught of questions would have sent students scrambling for an atlas and encyclopedia set.

Today anyone with a computer can launch a layer on the desktop globe Google Earth and virtually fly over Africa as they search for the correct answers.

Montenegro Splits From Serbia, Redrawing Europe’s Map

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 22, 2006   View Article

Citizens of Montenegro voted Sunday to cut ties with neighboring Serbia, crumbling the last vestige of communist-era Yugoslavia, according to early results released today.

The results, if ratified by Montenegro’s parliament, will draw a new political border between the two Balkan republics.

Young Americans Geographically Illiterate, Survey Suggests

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 2, 2006   View Article

Young adults in the United States fail to understand the world and their place in it, according to a survey-based report on geographic literacy released today.

Take Iraq, for example. Despite nearly constant news coverage since the war there began in 2003, 63 percent of Americans aged 18 to 24 failed to correctly locate the country on a map of the Middle East. Seventy percent could not find Iran or Israel.

New Mapping Tool Shows Impacts of Development Across the Globe

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: June 19, 2001   View Article

Step back and take in the big picture. Thousands of scientific studies assess the environmental impacts of a single road, or oil well, or mountain lodge, but the conclusions of these studies are generally disconnected. That is beginning to change.

The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) has developed a global mapping technique, called GLOBIO, that combines these myriad conclusions into a comprehensive picture of the cumulative toll that infrastructure development is having on the planet.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach