Human Evolution

Neandertals, Modern Humans May Have Interbred, Skull Study Suggests

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 16, 2007   View Article

Modern humans continued to evolve after they reached Europe 40,000 years ago and may have interbred with Neandertals, according to new research.

The findings are based on an analysis of the oldest modern human skull yet found in Europe.

Neandertal’s Last Stand Was in Gibraltar, Study Suggests

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: September 13, 2006   View Article

A new cave discovery suggests that Neandertals survived until at least 28,000 years ago—2,000 years longer than previously thought.

The Iberian Peninsula—now home to Spain, Portugal, and Gibraltar—was a final holdout for Neandertals (often spelled “Neanderthals”) as modern humans spread across the rest of Europe and an ice age descended, a new study says.

Hobbits Were Pygmy Ancestors, Not New Species, Study Says

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: August 21, 2006   View Article

The “hobbits” that lived on the Indonesian island of Flores until at least 18,000 years ago were not a distinct species of early human, a new analysis of the fossils suggests.

The hobbit remains were first proposed as a new species in 2004 after a single skull and the bones of several individuals were found on Flores.

“Hobbit” Island Tools Predate Modern Humans, Study Says

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 31, 2006   View Article

Long before the dawn of modern humans, relatively sophisticated tools were being made on the Indonesian island of Flores, a new study says.

Scientists who believe the creatures to be a separate human species have dubbed them Homo floresiensis. Their Lord of the Rings nickname comes courtesy of their height—about 3.3 feet, or 1 meter.

“Hobbit” Humans Were Diseased, Not New Species, Study Says

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 18, 2006   View Article

The “hobbit” humans that lived on the Indonesian island of Flores some 18,000 years ago were actually a population of modern humans stricken with a genetic disease that causes small brains, a new study says.

The argument is being made by a group of scientists who have analyzed all the scientific evidence presented so far about the evolution of the proposed species Homo floresiensis.

Fossil Find Is Missing Link in Human Evolution, Scientists Say

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: April 13, 2006   View Article

When the famous skeleton of an early human ancestor known as Lucy was discovered in Africa in the 1970s, scientists asked: Where did she come from?

Now, fossils found in the same region are providing solid answers, researchers have announced.

New Fossils Help Piece Together Human Origins

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 21, 2005   View Article

Fossil fragments of an early species of hominid have been unearthed with rhino, giraffe, monkey, hippo, and antelope remains in Africa. Hominids are upright-walking primates including modern humans and extinct and related forms. The new fossils are helping scientists piece together the earliest chapters of human evolution.

The fossils were unearthed from the Gona Study Area at As Duma in Ethiopia’s Afar region and are dated to between 4.3 and 4.5 million years ago.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach