Hotspot

Conservationists Name Nine New “Biodiversity Hotspots”

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: February 2, 2005   View Article

Today conservationists named nine new “biodiversity hotspots”—areas of mind-boggling species richness that are under constant assault from human activity. The label highlights the regions as priorities for the world’s conservation efforts.

One hotspot is a crucial stopover for migrating monarch butterflies. Another has the highest tree richness of any temperate region on the planet. And yet another is a mountain refuge for vultures, tigers, and wild water buffalo. All the newly named hotspots have lost at least 70 percent of their original natural habitat.

Deep Sea Hot Spots Harbor Abundant Life

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: June 24, 2004   View Article

The deep ocean floor is a dark, cold, remote, and seemingly lifeless place that until recently lay largely below the radar of science and exploration. But with advances in technology, scientists are accessing the deep and finding life everywhere they look.

“Typically the deep sea is very sparsely populated and at first glance it may appear as a vast, desolated plain of mud,” said Jeffrey Drazen, a marine biologist with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute in Moss Landing, California.

Hydrothermal Vents Found in Arctic Ocean

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 23, 2003   View Article

Marine scientists surveying an unexplored mountain range deep beneath the Arctic Ocean have discovered at least nine hydrothermal vents on the Gakkel Ridge, a mid-ocean mountain range that snakes for 1,100 miles (1,770 kilometers) from high above Greenland to Siberia.

Scientists say the underwater hotspots may potentially host unique forms of life previously unknown to science.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach