Greenland

Melting ice a ‘sleeping giant’ that will push sea levels higher, scientist says

Publication: NBC News   Date: December 13, 2013   View Article

By the time today’s preschoolers are babysitting their grandkids, global sea levels are likely to be pushing 2 feet higher than they are now and on the way to topping 8 feet above current levels by the year 2200, according to a new study.

The finding stems from geologic evidence that allowed scientists to tease apart a natural background pattern of how fast and how high sea levels rose as ice ages came and went over the past 2 million years.

Today’s pace of sea level rise is about twice as fast compared to historical standards, the team concluded. Going forward, seas will be pushed higher as rising temperatures force the great ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica to disintegrate, glaciers around the world to retreat toward mountaintops, and warming ocean waters to expand, the study notes.

Harsh carbon fee needed to avert disaster, warns top climate scientist

Publication: NBC News   Date: December 3, 2013   View Article

Time is almost out to avoid a climate catastrophe that would leave today’s children and future generations with a world starkly different from the one that nurtured civilization for the past 10,000 years, according to one of the world’s most eminent climate scientists.

Left unchecked, for example, rising global temperatures could soon cross thresholds that melt enough ice in Greenland and Antarctica to drown all of the world’s existing coastal cities in rising seas.

Greenland to sprout new shades of green as planet warms, study says

Publication: NBC News   Date: August 28, 2013   View Article

Scientists have long expected Greenland to get greener as the planet warms. Now they have a better idea of what trees will be able to take root on the Arctic island as the glaciers there retreat inland over the course of this century.

Newly published research shows that human assistance will be key to the spread of any trees over the coming decades.

Ice-free Arctic in our future, ancient climate record suggests

Publication: NBC News   Date: May 9, 2013   View Article

About 3 million years ago, evergreen forests — not tundra — carpeted the Arctic, Greenland was green, and sea ice only formed for a few months in the winter, if it formed at all, according to analysis of sediment pulled from a Russian lake.

“Where we are going is into this warmer world,” Julie Brigham-Grette, a geologist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, told NBC News.

At the time — the Pliocene — concentrations of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide were around 400 parts per million, the same as they are today. But Arctic temperatures were about 14.4 degrees Fahrenheit (8 degrees Celsius) warmer than today, explained Brigham-Grette, who led the analysis.

Chill out? Greenland glaciers’ acceleration to slow, study says

Publication: NBC News   Date: May 8, 2013   View Article

For the past ten years, skyscraper-sized icebergs have cracked off glaciers in Greenland and tumbled into the sea at an ever-quickening rate in response to global warming, raising concerns about runaway ice loss and rising seas. The good news? The rate of acceleration will slow, according to a new study.

The slowdown is related to the physics and geography that govern glacier movement, not a forecast that the rise in global temperatures will halt anytime soon. Indeed, the ice sheets will continue to melt and push up sea levels around the world, just not as quickly as feared, the study’s lead author said.

Hawaii to suffer most as global sea levels rise, study says

Publication: NBC News   Date: February 21, 2013   View Article

Melting ice in Greenland, Antarctica and elsewhere will push up seas unevenly around the world, according to a new study that finds some of the highest waters will inundate Honolulu, Hawaii.

At the poles, sea levels will actually fall because of the way sea, land and ice interact. For example, the sheer mass of water held in ice in Greenland and Antarctica generates a gravitational field that pulls in the surrounding water. As ice there melts, the gravitational pull weakens and the water is redistributed.

‘Horrible’ sea level rise of more than 3 feet plausible by 2100, experts say

Publication: NBC News   Date: January 6, 2013   View Article

Melting glaciers in Antarctica and Greenland may push up global sea levels more than 3 feet by the end of this century, according to a scientific poll of experts that brings a degree of clarity to a murky and controversial slice of climate science.

Such a rise in the seas would displace millions of people from low-lying countries such as Bangladesh, swamp atolls in the Pacific Ocean, cause dikes in Holland to fail, and cost coastal mega-cities from New York to Tokyo billions of dollars for construction of sea walls and other infrastructure to combat the tides.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach