Ecotourism

Antarctica Cruise Disaster Raises Tourism Concerns

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: November 27, 2007   View Article

Cruise ship accidents in Antarctica may be “inevitable,” at least one expert says.

The current surge in polar tourism and a reported increase in icebergs are raising safety and environmental concerns—which were brought boiling to the surface by this past weekend’s sinking of the M.S. Explorer.

Unique Mosses Spur Conservation, Ecotourism in Chile

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: November 14, 2006   View Article

A biosphere reserve on the southern tip of South America owes its existence, in part, to the diversity of mosses found there.

The Cape Horn Archipelago, a chain of wind-battered islands in the southernmost reaches of Chile, contains only a few tree species but a bounty of rare and unique mosses, according to William Buck, the curator of bryophytes at the New York Botanical Garden.

Tree Canopy Walks Draws Tourists, Scientists

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: October 7, 2003   View Article

The warblers, lemurs, and bees that tweet, screech, and buzz high in the treetops are sharing their once hidden domain with eco-tourists and scientists who’ve begun to wander along walkways that lead from the ground way up into the canopy.

The walkways are suspended from towers or the branches of trees, allowing people to look canopy-dwelling wildlife in the eyes and smell flowers that bloom a few hundred feet closer to the sun.

Tour Guides Research While Whale Watching

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: July 9, 2003   View Article

Hundreds of humpback whales spend their winter months breeding, giving birth, and caring for their young in Mexico’s sun-splashed Bahia de Banderas to the delight of the millions of tourists who flock to the resort community of Puerto Vallarta each year.

The humpbacks and most of the tourists have gone north for the summer. The whale breeding season runs from November through April and coincides with the high season for tourists seeking warm sun during the Northern Hemisphere’s winter.

Machu Picchu Under Threat From Pressures of Tourism

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: April 15, 2002   View Article

In 1911, an innkeeper from the Peruvian town of Aguas Calientes led Hiram Bingham on a scramble up a steep, jungle-tangled embankment to the extensive ruins of an Inca settlement that was named Machu Picchu for the neighboring mountain.

Bingham, a professor from Yale University who was exploring in the region, later wondered in his book, Lost City of the Incas, whether anyone would believe what he had found.

Rural Mexicans Learning to Make Ecotourism Pay

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: September 5, 2001   View Article

It’s not hard to advocate ecotourism—loosely defined as a form of travel that protects an area of the natural world while enabling the local people to preserve their culture and meet their daily needs.

The hard part is making ecotourism work.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach