Current

Earth Spun Faster in 2009 Due to Ocean Current?

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: February 22, 2012   View Article

Did it feel like time flew in November 2009? It turns out the days were actually going a wee bit faster for part of that month, according to a team of NASA and European scientists.

Earth spun about 0.1 millisecond faster for a two-week stretch, said study co-author Steven Marcus, a researcher at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

The planet’s speedier spin appears to have been due to a slowdown in an ocean current that whips around Antarctica.

Scientists Track Nutrients Around Oceans

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: June 17, 2004   View Article

The glass-hoarding behavior of single-celled plants called diatoms that dominate the surface layer of the ocean around Antarctica has allowed scientists to map the delivery of ocean nutrients around the world.

“Diatoms basically come to dominate wherever there is enough silicic acid and other nutrients around,” said Jorge Sarmiento, a professor of ocean and atmospheric sciences at Princeton University in New Jersey.

Ocean “Conveyor Belt” Sustains Sea Life, Study Says

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: June 15, 2004   View Article

An estimated three-quarters of all marine life is maintained by a single ocean-circulation pattern in the Southern Hemisphere that pulls nutrient-rich waters from the deep ocean, brings them to the surface, and distributes them around the world.

“This is really something,” said Jorge Sarmiento, a professor of atmospheric and ocean sciences at Princeton University in New Jersey. Sarmiento made the discovery using sophisticated computer models.

Do Fish Use Cold Current To Cross Tropics

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: February 5, 2003   View Article

A big, old Patagonian toothfish found thousands of miles from home is bolstering the theory that large fish can take advantage of very deep, cold ocean waters to cross the tropics from one polar region to the other, swimming under warm water in which they ordinarily could not survive.

The Patagonian toothfish (Dissostichtus eleginoides) is normally found in the icy sub-Antarctic waters off South America. So when a commercial halibut fisherman pulled one in November 2000 from the Davis Straight off the coast of Greenland, he was surprised.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach