Cave

Human Sacrifice Found in Maya City Sinkhole

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: July 6, 2011   View Article

The bones of six humans—including two children—jade beads, shells, and stone tools are among the Maya”treasures” recently found in a water-filled cave off a sinkhole at the famous archaeological site of Chichén Itzá in Mexico, archaeologists say.

The ancient objects are most likely related to a ritual human sacrifice during a time when water levels were lower, sometime between A.D. 850 and 1250, the researchers say.

Ancient rock art from around the world

Publication: MSNBC.com   Date: March 23, 2009   View Article

Even 15,000 years ago, humans were compelled to decorate the interior walls of their abodes. Back then – the Stone Age – home was often no more than a cave, but the artwork was sophisticated and sublime. Check out eight examples of rock art from around the world.

Neanderthals Ate Dolphins, Seals, Cave Remains Suggest

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: September 22, 2008   View Article

Neanderthals living in a pair of caves on the Mediterranean Sea regularly feasted on mussels, fish, and other types of marine life, according to a new study.

The finding suggests that Neanderthals actively foraged for seafood just like early modern humans, according to Clive Finlayson, an anthropologist at the Gibraltar Museum.

World’s Longest Underwater River Discovered in Mexico, Divers Say

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: March 5, 2007   View Article

Divers exploring a maze of underwater caves on Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula have identified what may be the longest underground river in the world.

The waterway twists and turns for 95 miles (153 kilometers) through the region’s limestone caverns, said British diver Stephen Bogaerts, who made the discovery with German colleague Robbie Schmittner.

Neandertal’s Last Stand Was in Gibraltar, Study Suggests

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: September 13, 2006   View Article

A new cave discovery suggests that Neandertals survived until at least 28,000 years ago—2,000 years longer than previously thought.

The Iberian Peninsula—now home to Spain, Portugal, and Gibraltar—was a final holdout for Neandertals (often spelled “Neanderthals”) as modern humans spread across the rest of Europe and an ice age descended, a new study says.

Arizona Tries to Save “Living Cave”

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: April 19, 2005   View Article

In 1974 cool, moist air billowed from a crack in Arizona’s sunbaked desert and lured cave hunters Randy Tufts and Gary Tenen underground. There, glistening formations of rock hung from the ceiling like icicles and sprouted from the ground. The explorers were overwhelmed. They’d discovered a so-called living cave.

Tufts and Tenen were the first humans known to set foot in the Kartchner Caverns, which today are among the world’s top show caves.

Scientist Journeys Into Caves for Clues to Extreme Life

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: April 30, 2001   View Article

Caving is a highbrow sport. It takes intellectual prowess in the disciplines of geology and hydrology to know how a cave forms, and thus how to identify where hidden passages lie, said Hazel Barton, a microbiologist at the University of Colorado in Boulder, Colorado.

Barton should know. She started caving as a teenager and has become one of the world’s foremost cave cartographers. Today, she employs her uncanny ability to seek out caves as part of her work in studying extremophiles—organisms that thrive in environments where human life could not.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach