Antarctic

Oldest Antarctic Whale Found, Shows Fast Evolution

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: November 16, 2011   View Article

The oldest known whale to ply the Antarctic has been found, scientists say.

A 24-inch-long (60-centimeter-long) jawbone was recently discovered amid a rich deposit of fossils on the Antarctic Peninsula.

The creature, which may have reached lengths of up to 20 feet (6 meters), had a mouthful of teeth and likely feasted on giant penguins, sharks, and big bony fish, whose remains were also discovered with the jawbone.

2000-2010: A Decade of (Climate) Change

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: December 10, 2009   View Article

A decade ago, global climate change was largely considered a problem for the distant future. But it seems that future has come sooner than predicted.

One of the most remarkable, and alarming, environmental changes to occur over the last decade is the melting of Antarctic ice sheets and the recession of Arctic glaciers at speeds much faster than climate change models had predicted, according to environment experts.

Does Life Exist in Antarctic Lake Buried Under Miles of Ice

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: November 15, 2004   View Article

Some years ago, researchers found something that sent shivers through the scientific community: a diverse community of microbial life-forms that live without sunlight or a ready supply of nutrients.

The scientists were not searching deep space when they made their find. Rather, they were sampling the bottom of a 2.5-mile-thick (4-kilometer-thick) Antarctic ice sheet.

Antarctic Lakes: 145 and Counting, Scientists Say

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: November 1, 2004   View Article

Don’t don your swim trunks just yet, but deep beneath the Antarctic ice sheets are at least 145 lakes that may be teeming with microscopic organisms similar to those that could be thriving beneath the ice on Jupiter’s moon Europa, according to scientists.

The lakes lie beneath blankets of ice up to 2.5 miles (4 kilometers) thick and are considered one of the great unexplored frontiers on Earth.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach