Archive for February, 2007

Ice Shelf Collapses Reveal New Species, Ecosystem Changes

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: February 27, 2007   View Article

Even before the global launch of International Polar Year this Thursday, scientists are announcing some unusual discoveries from the cold waters off the Antarctic Peninsula.

The collapse of two massive ice shelves in the past 12 years has opened a window onto a pristine—but rapidly changing—underwater world, an expedition team reported on Sunday.

Time to Reset

Publication: MSN Tech & Gadgets   Date: February 25, 2007   View Article

Daylight-saving time starts three weeks earlier this year (2 a.m. Sunday, March 11, 2007). Are you and your gadgets ready?

Chimps Use “Spears” to Hunt Mammals, Study Says

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: February 22, 2007   View Article

For the first time, great apes have been observed making and using tools to hunt mammals, according to a new study. The discovery offers insight into the evolution of hunting behavior in early humans.

No fewer than 22 times, researchers documented wild chimpanzees on an African savanna fashioning sticks into “spears” to hunt small primates called lesser bush babies.

Antifreeze-Like Blood Lets Frogs Freeze and Thaw With Winter’s Whims

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: February 20, 2007   View Article

The freeze-thaw, freeze-thaw see-saw of this winter’s temperatures may be a sign of global warming. But for now wood frogs are weathering the flux in style, according to an expert on the amphibians.

Americans Cooked With Chili Peppers 6,000 Years Ago, Study Finds

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: February 15, 2007   View Article

Domesticated chili peppers started to spice up dishes across the Americas at least 6,000 years ago, according to new research tracing the early spread of the crop.

Peppers quickly spread around the world after Christopher Columbus brought them back to Europe at the end of the 15th century, but their ancient history had been poorly known until now.

Moths Elude Spiders by Mimicking Them, Study Says

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: February 14, 2007   View Article

The arrival of a jumping spider sends most moths into a flutter trying to escape the predator’s lethal pounce.

Not so for metalmark moths in the genus Brenthia. These moths stand their ground with hind wings flared and forewings held above the body at a slight angle.

“No Two Snowflakes the Same” Likely True, Research Reveals

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: February 13, 2007   View Article

More than ten feet (three meters) of snow fell last week in parts of upstate New York, and more is forecast for the U.S. Northeast in the coming days.

In all that snow, however, scientists believe the chance that any two flakes are exactly alike is virtually zero.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach