Archive for January, 2007

Warming Oceans Put Kink in Food Chain, Study Says

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 30, 2007   View Article

The growth of tiny plants at the base of the ocean food chain is tightly linked to changes in the climate, according to a recent study.

The finding shows that as temperatures warm, the growth of single-celled ocean plants called phytoplankton slows at Earth’s mid and low latitudes. The plants’ growth increases when the climate cools.

“Hobbit” Was Own Species, Not Diseased Human, Brain Study Says

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 29, 2007   View Article

A tiny, hobbit-like human that lived on a remote Indonesian island 18,000 years ago was a member of its own unique species and was not a diseased human, according to a new study of the hominin’s skull.

Alps Glaciers Gone by 2050, Expert Says

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 23, 2007   View Article

Glaciers are quickly disappearing from the Alps and will be all but gone by 2050, a climate expert said Monday. That’s 50 years earlier than a July 2006 study predicted.

The loss would change the supply of drinking and irrigation water, lead to more falling rocks, and cripple the European ski industry.

Airline Passengers, Relax: Turbulence Detectors Are on the Way

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 22, 2007   View Article

Wouldn’t it be nice if airline pilots turned on the “fasten seat belt” sign before the person standing in the aisle toppled onto your lap because of turbulence?

NASA researchers are on the job. They are developing a pair of technologies that will give pilots several minutes’ warning so they can steer clear of the erratic, gusty winds.

“Weirdest” Animals to Get Conservation Attention

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 16, 2007   View Article

A conservation effort announced today aims to protect some of the world’s oddest and most overlooked animal species.

The Evolutionarily Distinct and Globally Endangered (EDGE) program, led by the Zoological Society of London, focuses on animals that have unique evolutionary histories and face immediate risk of extinction.

Neandertals, Modern Humans May Have Interbred, Skull Study Suggests

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 16, 2007   View Article

Modern humans continued to evolve after they reached Europe 40,000 years ago and may have interbred with Neandertals, according to new research.

The findings are based on an analysis of the oldest modern human skull yet found in Europe.

Photo in the News: Chandra Solves Supernova Mystery

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: January 11, 2007   View Article

The most detailed x-ray image yet of one of the youngest known supernova remnants—the debris cloud created when a massive star explodes—solves a long-standing mystery about how the star died, an astronomer announced on Tuesday.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach