Archive for May, 2002

Dinosaur Tracks Shed Light on Sauropod Evolution

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 30, 2002   View Article

Dinosaur tracks made on the edge of a coastal plain 163 million years ago in middle England are providing a team of researchers with new insights into the evolution and behavior of sauropods.

Sauropods are the group of plant-eating dinosaurs distinguished by their long necks and tails. They include some of the largest creatures ever to walk on Earth.

Zoo Primates Go Bananas Over National Geographic

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 13, 2002   View Article

National Geographic may have just acquired a new fan base; but is it the pictures, or the cool covers? The chimpanzees at the Henry Vilas Zoo in Madison, Wisconsin, recently received six boxes of back issues from a group of local schoolchildren, and the publications appear to be a big hit.

The magazines are scattered about their living quarters to simulate the big leafy plants found in their native habitat, said Jim Hubing, director of the zoo. But the chimps sometimes flip through the glossy pages, and react to certain pictures.

New Zealand Tries to Cap Gaseous Sheep Burps

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 13, 2002   View Article

New Zealand scientists trying to curb their country’s influence on global warming may have found an answer to belch about: Livestock that eat plants high in condensed tannins produce up to 16 percent less methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

Tannins are the yellow-brown chemical compounds found in many plants and give red wine its distinctive flavor.

Fighter Jet Fights for “Vulcanoid” Asteroids

Publication: National Geographic News   Date: May 6, 2002   View Article

Space scientists hitched a ride earlier this year aboard an F/A-18B fighter jet traveling through the stratosphere at 0.92 Mach. From the cockpit, the night sky was inky black and pierced with diamond-like planets, streaks of comet dust, and a zodiac of light.

Not out merely for a night ride, the scientists had their eyes trained on the western horizon, where twilight hung low in a range from deep blue to glowing red.

© 2008-2010 Collected Writings By John Roach